purchase agreement car
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As the company, how do I correctly fill out a Stock Power as part of a stock purchase agreement?
The Stock Power in question evidently is an exhibit to a Stock Purchase Agreement by which the OP is purchasing restricted stock that is subject to forfeiture or repurchase by the company, entirely or in part, probably based on how long the OP continues to work with the company.Yes, just signing is the proper thing to do (from the company’s perspective) because at this time it is not known whether, or to what extent, the OP’s shares will be subject to forfeiture or repurchase.So, if and when the time for forfeiture or repurchase arrives, the company will fill in the rest of the Stock Power to transfer the forfeited or repurchased shares to the company - you will keep the shares that have vested as of that time.For the OP’s comparison, and for the benefit of Quorans who are not familiar with such Stock Powers, here is the text of the instructions that I put at the bottom of a Stock Power:(Instruction: Please do not fill in any blanks other than signing at the signature line. The purpose of this Stock Power is to enable the Company to exercise its right to reacquire Restricted Shares in the circumstances provided in the Restricted Stock Agreement without requiring an additional signature by the Grantee.)
Have you ever quit a job in an unplanned manner where one day you just snapped and said “I’ve had enough of this, I’m done”?
Back in 2003, I worked for a small construction firm. I was the 'administrative assistant' - which meant receptionist, book-keeper, contract preparer, scheduler, and records/file manager. It was a very busy firm, and the position was challenging and fun. Then the Project Manager I worked under retired and the company replaced him with "J" … this was someone who needed everything to be done HIS way. He criticized everything I did and declared me to be incompetent on a regular basis. Once, I came in to work on Monday and found over 100 job files piled in stacks on the floor, pulled apart. Each file folder had 12 specific sections. J decided he did not like how they were divided and wanted to condense them into only 5 sections, and to make sure it was done, he had spent hours on Sunday tearing apart all the files, leaving them for me to reassemble in the format he required. It took me 3 days to get it all reorganized, then we had a visit from the company owner (from a different city)who went ballistic and raked ME over the coals for not keeping the files properly (Naturally J did not claim responsibility) and told me if I didn't have things properly restored by the following Monday, I would be fired. I worked through the weened to restore the file system. This was while doing all my other tasks as well.The final straw came about a month later. One of the more complicated tasks I did was an elaborate invoice form for the state department of transportation. It was a multipage document, that had multiple fields that were used to calculate the totals in various other fields. This one invoice covered seven different jobs we were involved with. Throughout the month, I entered work times, material costs, and various other data into a multidimensional Access database that I had developed just for this purpose. I had used Access because my previous Manager had insisted on Access because that was what he knew. We had used this system successfully for over a year. J, the new guy, did not understand how matrix databases worked, and was not comfortable with "the secretary" knowing how to generate those invoices when he could not. I came in on a Monday, ready to finalize the monthly invoice and discovered the database was gone. He had "dumped" all the data into ONE EXCEL spread sheet Not even a workbook. Without keeping the different equations or related links. Because he could understand Excel. Only when he tried to develop the invoice, he couldn't because it was too confusing and not properly organized. He told me I had to produce the invoice, for his review, by close of business. Oh, and he had destroyed the backups of the Access database and removed Access from the computer system so I would not be 'lazy' and just restore that program. He had also simply deleted the data from all the prior invoices, saying we did not need that since we had hard copies of the actual invoices. I called the Home Office an explained what happened. The owner told me to just 'roll with it and do the best I could' while J was learning the company, and don't worry about the details. Then he spoke to J. After the call, J came into my office area, yelling and screaming at me to 'going behind his back' because I was too stupid and lazy to do my job! I let him rant, when he ran out of steam he stormed out of the building telling me to get to work. By the time he returned, I had cleared out my desk, and left a letter of resignation on his, with a copy faxed to the home office. I was immediately hired by a large engineering firm, who recognized the skills I had acquired at the construction firm. I started that job one week later. It was a much better job, with significantly higher pay and better benefits, so in the long run, J being a total jerk was to my benefit. I learned about a year later that the state cancelled their contracts, in large part because of significant errors and conflicts with the billing - all of which started with the first invoice after I left. Gee - I wonder if that was related?
How does Vast.com make money?
Simple question, with a not-so-simple answer. In short, through a lot of different ways. We have a very complicated and diversified revenue model.We're a performance-based business: we get paid by converting traffic and funneling them towards a purchase decision. For example, when a user searches for a car and they fill out a form indicating interest in the vehicle.We make money through CPM, CPC, CPL, and CPA. For example, if one of our partners has a car or house that gets sold, we get a fixed fee or percentage commission (depending on the agreement) based on the final sale price.
How can I get myself out of a car purchase?
Most countries would have a cooling-off period for large purchases like this. If they provided you with an invoice or proof of ownership (which you really should have been given), there should be fine print and/or a disclaimer on your terms & conditions of your cooling-off period. Read it and stick it back to him!If you weren't handed any documents to verify the purchase, then you'll have a problem. You can still contact consumer affairs (if there is one in your country) to appeal your transaction. But again, very difficult without paperwork. This really depends where you live.But for now, read through the terms & conditions and do your damn best to lawyer your way through. Either that, or get a well paying job and start paying that loan off. Or void the loan and lose the car. Ideally, you should learn your rights (by reading the terms & conditions), and legally fight back.At the very least, I hope you learned an important lesson.
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